Nov 14, 2017

Fast No Knead Dinner Rolls

Crusty Artisan RollsJust in time for Thanksgiving, here is an even faster way to make my original crusty rolls. And you can make them ahead and freeze. They freeze beautifully and you can re-crisp, directly from freezer to oven, in minutes. They are even more crusty when you freeze and reheat!

The original version takes 4 hours but this one is ready in half the time – TWO hours! Using more yeast and hot water, it’s the fastest way I know to make these fabulous dinner rolls. It’s important that your oven be preheated to 450° F and my oven takes 35 minutes to reach 450. It’s really best to use an oven thermometer to make sure your oven it hot enough as these rolls depend on the first blast of high heat to puff up and rise.

This dough is sticky so it may help to see how to shape the rolls by watching the video attached to my original version of No Knead Crusty Rolls.

These fabulous artisan rolls can be made ahead and nicely re-crisped the next day or better still, make, cool, and freeze and just reheat by placing them directly on the oven rack, preheated to 325 °F, for 10-12 minutes. I’m always excited when I can find a way to make something easier and faster, especially when it’s homemade bread. They’re not just dinner rolls – I had them for breakfast today.

So there are three ways to make these crusty rolls. One is my original 4-hour recipe. Two is the overnight version where you use cold water and let the dough sit out overnight. And third, this new, fastest way ever to make no knead crusty rolls – in two hours!  Click here for the recipe. – Jenny Jones

7 Comments on "Fast No Knead Dinner Rolls"

  1. Eithne Laffan

    Jenny we had your rolls for thanksgiving and they were delicious, thank you so much

  2. D. Lynn Carmichael (aka Danusia)

    Here is my experience turning these fastest no-knead dinner rolls into a whole wheat version.
    First, I pretty much only use white whole wheat flour in anything bready and yeasty … regular whole wheat flour (different grain type) results in very dense, heavy output that is not appealing.
    Using a straight substitution of half white-whole-wheat flour, and keeping everything else the same: time, temp, amount of liquid, these buns turned out hard as rocks and could have been used as baseballs!
    As I approached the kitchen, I could smell that overbaked odor … could only lol when I took them out of the oven. No dice.
    Did some homework and gave it another shot.
    *King Arthur flour website has a near-thesis on flour subsitutions. In short, they say only substitute half the flour in the recipe with White Whole Wheat (different grain type from regular whole wheat) flour — *otherwise, you have to make other changes, such as amount of liquid etc.
    I looked at many recipes for whole wheat bread buns, most called for half white whole-wheat flour, the other half all-purpose flour. *Importantly, they all used a 375°F oven temperaure, for 20 minutes.
    After making those changes, my fast no-knead whole-wheat buns turned out very nicely.
    Hope this feedback is helpful.

  3. Franca

    Hi Jenny. I have the same question as Joyce. Can we make these whole wheat? If we can how much more of the liquid is needed.

  4. Joyce

    How would you Make these rolls as wheat ? Would you add.more yeast?

    • Theo107

      Hi, Joyce and Franka, To make both Jenny’s quick rolls and Dutch oven bread 100% whole wheat use a 50 / 50 mix of whole wheat flour and whole wheat pastry flour ( also known as white whole wheat flour ) and double the amount of yeast.
      Every other ingredient remains the same.
      The bread and rolls are even more delicious when made with all whole wheat and the extra yeast keeps them from being overly dense and heavy. ENJOY!
      Thanks to Jenny, we can have bread and rolls fresh from the oven any time we wish!

      • Jenny Can Cook

        I wanted to try your idea and share my results but white whole wheat flour is not the same as whole wheat pastry flour. They are each made from different kinds of wheat – white whole wheat flour has a lot more gluten than whole wheat pastry flour. Can you please clarify which one you use as I would love to try it. Thank you.

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